Climate Change is not real!

Discussion in 'General Discussion Forum' started by Crni Vuk, Jul 26, 2019.

  1. The Dopamine Cleric

    The Dopamine Cleric Lived Through the Heat Death
    Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    The point I'm trying to make is that energy independence doesn't require government interference except for standard safety requirements used on appliances we buy already.
     
  2. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    Good luck with that. I don't think you fully understand the power requirements of the average home, the efficiency and reliability of most insular power generation systems, and the general complexity of the electrical grid and why it exists.
     
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  3. The Dopamine Cleric

    The Dopamine Cleric Lived Through the Heat Death
    Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    I don't think you understand the thousands of already energy self-sufficient homes and business grids already active here in the united states.

    Of course you were never exposed to it so you think you need daddy to do it for you.

    Now go ahead and try to be right by changing the frame of argument about how people cant make plastic or whatever, ignoring the fact that im talking specifically about eletrical energy independence for each home.


    We could always chase abstraction if you prefer saying that gasoline for car transportation is required and how food is required from a community which is in itself a form of government yada yada yada. Buy a fucking solar panel and hydrogen generator a windmill or two.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2019
  4. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    I'm sure it can be done, on a certain scale. Especially for private homes with lots of space and smaller businesses. But as population density grows, it falls apart. Similarly, fully independent insular grids are rare even in the US, and even if you somehow could distribute the entire population of the US or Germany or whatever in such a way that everyone could have enough space to create its own energy, every single home would have to deal with its own grid problems. There'd be no grid to adapt to load changes, nothing to distribute excess energy for storage. Purely, fully insular energy production will make maintenance ridiculously complex. I mean, nice, instead of a blackout for the entire block or city you only get blackouts for a house at a time, but those will happen constantly. Yes, it's great for remote and sparsely populated areas, but you'd basically have to massively roll back urbanization to make it work.
    And you couldn't even connect to your neighbour's house in an emergency, because your grids aren't synchronized (unless you wanna go full direct current, which has its own set of problems).
     
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  5. The Dopamine Cleric

    The Dopamine Cleric Lived Through the Heat Death
    Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    The only challenge is silicon and metal distribution which could be done if the demand was placed on the marketplace. Most electrical wiring for buildings and infrastructure is already in place. Of course you might need thr government in the worst places to prevent people from fucking the equipment or using it to cure autism instead of using it properly.

    Its more about mindset. Thats the reason it hasn't been done. This system is more convenient for the modern fat fuck.
     
  6. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    Silicon and metal distribution? What do you mean?
    How do you generate the electricity to begin with? Wind and solar? Generators?
    And what about urban centers?
     
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  7. TheGM

    TheGM The voice of reason

    Aug 19, 2008
    That's what I want to know. Not everybody lives in the southwest US and 5 months out of the year I'm under feet of snow.
     
  8. The Dopamine Cleric

    The Dopamine Cleric Lived Through the Heat Death
    Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    Each building in an urban center is the responsibility of the owner.

    Skyscrapers are cool because they are a giant solar panel and windfarm

    Crowded housing with 20 students are the only issue. The government run institutions of transportation and other services can be supplied offsite using the grid in place. So what you get is all of this bandwidth that is freed because personal usage is produced on site per home. Of course batteries will continue to evolve and there will be emergency systems for crucial services that can ise gasoline.
     
  9. TheGM

    TheGM The voice of reason

    Aug 19, 2008
    Exactly how much money did you lose on investing into solar roadways?
     
  10. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    A solution here would be energy storage. Something that's already done with gas in many places where large quantities of natural gas is stored as reserve for the case the pipelines don't work or other issues. Many east European nations get their gas from Russia and they tend to like to sometimes stop delivering. Particularly during winter months.

    But I digress. You could use solar power in summer or in regions with a large amount of sunshine over the year to generate hydrogen and I think even natural gas - but I am not sure on that one. The Hydrogen could be used in winter months or areas with relatively low amount of sunshine. The advantage is that some areas which already use natural gas could already provide most of the infrastructure for it.
     
  11. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    Oh, ok, it's everyone's responsibility. Good solution. So the owners of skyscrapers just have to generate their ~2MWh demands in their basements. No problem. Covering them in solar panels and windmills will surely generate that much energy, because in urban centers all buildings are always in the sun.
    Using the existing grid? Every subway gets their own small power plant?
    And remember that for every kilowatt generated you need that kilowatt in storage, multiplied by the hours you want the lights to stay on.
    I like the idea of distributed power generation and smart grids. It's certainly the future. But fully independent insular grids are a logistic nightmare, technically unfeasible and frankly a pipedream for anyone not living in a house in a remote area with lots of space. This has nothing to do with wanting to depend on the government, it's purely technical.
     
  12. The Dopamine Cleric

    The Dopamine Cleric Lived Through the Heat Death
    Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    You guys are forgetting hydrogen generators but thats a secret because the auto industry doesnt want you to know about the hydrogen car.

    Ill link a video here in a minute.
     
  13. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    I'm not forgetting anything. Hydrogen is nice, sure, but not very efficient, and storage is an issue. An issue being solved with newest pressure tanks, but still an issue for individual housing application. Again, it will be a logistic nightmare.
     
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  14. The Dopamine Cleric

    The Dopamine Cleric Lived Through the Heat Death
    Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007










    Ohh and btw, Im finding more videos. These are out of date.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2019
  15. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    Again, great, if you live somewhere with the space for that many hydrogen tanks. You're basically doubling the space required for everyone to live with those tanks. It's all fine and dandy for large open areas, but unfeasible in urban areas.
     
  16. The Dopamine Cleric

    The Dopamine Cleric Lived Through the Heat Death
    Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007

    You're missing the point. The point is a combination of solar, wind, hydrogen, geothermal, ect. makes more than enough power required.



    What you have is a bunch of systems that make it more than viable to be completely energy independent.

    So what you're going to have in the most congested urban areas is some areas needing access to a grid that has 95% of the demand gone which is the same amount on average that the standard grid uses renewable energy already.


    There is a science project here in New Mexico that has it's own HHO generator that is linked to a greenhouse mulch sewer system so let me find that.


    Heres a question, why don't our own water systems generate power to begin with?

    *Edit* I can't find the damn thing, but I don't need to. The point is we have more than enough efficient energy generation systems to make the majority of homes around the world energy independent.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2019
  17. TheGM

    TheGM The voice of reason

    Aug 19, 2008
    In the future we will make electricity out of *dramatic pause* WATER!

    Eh, somebody should tells these jagovs we got that now, it is called Steam.
     
  18. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    Like, use the flow of the water through the pipes to generate electricity? Yeah nah.
    I mean, yes, of course we could make everyone completely independent. But it would mean that everyone has to pay a few ten- to hundredthousand bucks just to live in a world of grid security on par with South Africa. And what would be the point? More efficient? No. Massively increased material costs and individual infrastructure. Less CO2? I doubt that, especially if you also want some resemblance of stability in your power supply. You can go independent, but just so the gummint is out of your basement? Don't bet on it.
    There is one way to make a distributed grid that is almost CO2 free. Small modular reactors. You can have a flexible grid of Gen IV reactors that have passive safety features and, often, can process nuclear waste.
     
  19. valcik

    valcik So Old I'm Losing Radiation Signs

    Dec 20, 2008
    Glaciers can't melt soon enough! I'll just wait here at 300 MASL with five meter long stick prepared and everything, in order to push the boat with furiosly paddling Vuk in it back in the ocean when the time comes.
     
  20. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    Lel, some guy organized charter trains for a Fridays for Future demonstration and paid out of his pocket (because the world-saving dreadlocked white hippy students are always those with a fat inheritance in their pockets), and now realized that since Fridays for Future is not really an actual organization (yet) he's not getting anything from those 77k back. Of course, people paid for tickets and donated and that would be more than enough to pay him back, but, you know, FFF also doesn't give a shit.