Zegh's Dinosaur Thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion Forum' started by zegh8578, Jan 23, 2017.

  1. ThatZenoGuy

    ThatZenoGuy Residential Sexy Anthro Goddess...Mutant.

    Nov 8, 2016
    OOooh!

    I remember that from the Jurassic Park Tresspasser game!
     
  2. TorontRayne

    TorontRayne Misanthropic God of Rations Staff Member Moderator Orderite

    Apr 1, 2005
    Fixed it.
     
    • [Like] [Like] x 1
  3. MutantScalper

    MutantScalper Dark side in da houssah

    Nov 22, 2009
    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-40890714

    Scientists have solved the puzzle of the so-called "Frankenstein dinosaur", which seems to consist of body parts from unrelated species.

    A new study suggests that it is in fact the missing link between plant-eating dinosaurs, such as Stegosaurus, and carnivorous dinosaurs, like T. rex.

    The finding provides fresh insight on the evolution of the group of dinos known as the ornithischians.

    The study is published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters.

     
  4. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    This is actually quite interesting, but as always, I cringe at the simple-media-speak replacement of scientific terminology :D

    Here's the jist - for centuries, Dinosaurs have traditionally been seen as TWO main groups, splitting further into three:

    Dinosauria
    |---Saurischia
    | |-Theropoda (including birds)
    | |-Sauropoda
    |
    |---Ornithischia (all other herbivores, such as Stegosaurus, Ankylosaurus, Triceratops, Iguanodon)

    Over time, it has been discovered that very basal forms, as in - ancestor theropods, ancestor sauropods and ancestor ornithischians, all are *very* similar, no wonder, they all descend from stem-dinosaurians, and would have been closely related.

    Studying these, it was recently discovered that we - since always - have understood the "core" of dinosaur relations wrongly, and the tree looks more like this:

    Dinosauria
    |---Ornithoscelida (proposed)
    | |-Theropoda (including birds)
    | |-Ornithischia
    |
    |---Sauropoda

    Some have pragmatically suggested to move Sauropoda outside of Dinosauria as well, but this has not been met with a lot of agreement.

    The dinosaur in the article (Chilesaurus) was found fairly recently, but before the re-understanding of core dinosaur relationships, and showed both Theropod and Ornithischian features. If you look at the traditional tree, it is understandable how confusing this would be, since there is a large evolutionary gap between them. Chilesaurus retrospectively sort of confirms Ornithoscelida as proposed grouping.

    Now, first of all a pet peeve: People should stop talking about "missing links", it is misleading, and makes evolution look like creation. *ALL* organisms link their ancestors with their descendants, period.
    Secondly, Chilesaurus would *not* be a missing link *either way*, since it is instead a "living fossil" - a late surviving descendant of basal Ornithoscelidans.
    Chilesaurus is to Theropods and Ornithischians sortof what Chimpanzees are to humans, they are not our ancestors, because they are living alongside us, but they look a lot like our ancestors once did, and their anatomy helps us understand our own past.
     
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  5. ThatZenoGuy

    ThatZenoGuy Residential Sexy Anthro Goddess...Mutant.

    Nov 8, 2016
    1v1, against a velociraptor, what chance would a grown man with nothing but clothes have of killing it?
     
  6. Atomkilla

    Atomkilla Hazel Hegemon oTO Orderite

    Dec 26, 2010
  7. ThatZenoGuy

    ThatZenoGuy Residential Sexy Anthro Goddess...Mutant.

    Nov 8, 2016
    They's like, the size of a large turkey though.

    And being dinos of that size, lightly built.
     
  8. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    Yeah, a turkey with racersharp teeth and claws that eats flesh though.

    GOBBLE GOBBLE MOTHERFUCKER!

     
  9. ThatZenoGuy

    ThatZenoGuy Residential Sexy Anthro Goddess...Mutant.

    Nov 8, 2016
    Of course, but a good punch could break its bones, or stomp it, etc.

    Humans can beat heavier, stockier dogs with their fists.
     
  10. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    And the the actor who's playing the Mountain in Game of Thrones could probably beat a chimp in a close combat fight.

    But I would say the number of humans that can actually beat dogs, is rathe a minority. They are used by the police as attack dogs for a reason.

    And it is believed that Raptors also defended them self from heavier and bigger creatures as well. So I don't think it would would be an easy fight to pick for the average person.
     
  11. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    Atom is right, a Velociraptor has been found locked-and-dead with a Protoceratops, showing an affinity for quite large prey, considering most current predators V's size tend to go for large rodents

    Velociraptor was specialized for larger prey, and would make short process using rapid kicks to slice open their victim. The claws of the above mentioned fossil, was indeed found jammed in the neck area of Protoceratops, and the only reason they both died was a sand-storm surprised them.

    Deinonychus, the size of wolves, are known, from teeth-marks and associated fossils, to have downed Tenontosaurus, which were three times bigger, and unlike wolves (who down moose), it was very probably not a matter of attrition, but again, resorting to rapid kicks, while grabbing on with their hands.
     
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  12. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    I think ThatZenoGuy is just looking for excuses to hump a Raptor.
     
    • [Like] [Like] x 1
  13. ThatZenoGuy

    ThatZenoGuy Residential Sexy Anthro Goddess...Mutant.

    Nov 8, 2016
    *Eyes dart right and left*

    Say if this raptor had its legs binded...