What Was The Technology Behind Fallout (1 & 2)'s Graphics?

Discussion in 'General Fallout Discussion' started by ArmagdoGaming, Oct 28, 2019.

  1. ArmagdoGaming

    ArmagdoGaming First time out of the vault

    10
    Nov 11, 2018
    Before anyone points out that this breaks rule 3, there is no "Technical" sub-forum (Or whatever it's called.). Most of them state "...or have a technical problem with the games...". If I am mistaken, I'd gladly take this thread down. Thanks.

    Anyways, onto the actual question. What was the technology behind the making of Fallout 1 and Fallout 2's graphics? I honestly think they look gorgeous, and still hold up to this day.
    I searched around a bit. From what I understand, it was a real life sculpt, scanned, and modified virtually.
    But, I have some question that I can't seem to be able to find an answer to. What tech did they use to scan them? How did they get the mouths to move? Open and close? How did they get them to look around? Are these types of models still being able to be made today? Does it still need the real-life aspect in it (Sculpting, scanning, etc.)?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Paladin Hank

    Paladin Hank It Wandered In From the Wastes

    198
    May 6, 2018
    Mah man. Couldn't agree more. Even though I love New Vegas, it really lacks the artistry and general gorgeousness of the older Fallout games (this mainly due to it being made using the gamebryo engine, aka dogshit).

    As for an answer to your question, here's what I could find:

    "After the team worked out exactly what it was after, a sculptor made a clay head that fit the bill. From there, the artists took the completed head and carefully studied it to see what parts of the face needed to be animated most in order to create a realistic final image. Using a Faro Space Arm and the VertiSketch software, the team digitized the head, and then used theLightWave modeling software to do necessary geometric corrections. Next, texture maps were created in Photoshop and laid onto the modeled head. Finally, the art team began working on the animation."

    ”— NG preview
    • Talking heads were proposed during the game's development by Leonard Boyarsky. Most of them were painstakingly copied into the digital format from clay models by Scott Rodenhizer. Originally, Fallout was supposed to have 40-50 talking heads, but the average time to do one head, 8 weeks, was too time consuming and was pushed done to just 21.


    I wonder where all the clay models of the talking heads are... I would pay very good money to own them. They're probably lying in someone's abandoned basement, gathering dust...

    EDIT:
    Just found this old post that seems to reinforce my suspicions.
    http://www.gamesas.com/fallout-clay-sculptures-t103194.html
     
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  3. ArmagdoGaming

    ArmagdoGaming First time out of the vault

    10
    Nov 11, 2018
    Thank you for taking the time to answer my question. I truly appreciate it.
     
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  4. Paladin Hank

    Paladin Hank It Wandered In From the Wastes

    198
    May 6, 2018
    It was my pleasure. Always happy to help a fellow Fallout fan.
     
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  5. .Pixote.

    .Pixote. Venerable Relic of the Wastes
    Modder

    Sep 14, 2009
    The walls, scenery, tiles, items and critters were generally made in 3d (Lightwave) - then later touched up in Photoshop to add that extra magic. There's nothing technically difficult about how they made the art, but with the restricted colour palette, and the art direction from Leonard Boyarsky the game has a special grimey "cartoonish" quality.

    If you open the mapper and look at the various artworks you'll realise that the order of the art is the order they built it - so first came the Vault artwork, and then the expanded it into desert tiles - shitty shanties, etc.

    They were inspired by Crusader: No Remorse.

     
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