This goddamn forum: stereotypes abound!

Discussion in 'General Discussion Forum' started by Superman, Apr 29, 2016.

  1. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
    I've been here since before most of today active orderites, hell, probably than most orderites as a whole, I really don't think they are special, I did however always thought they were *special*, you know, like the olimpics...
     
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  2. Dr Fallout

    Dr Fallout Centurion

    Aug 17, 2015
    You mean the Paraolympics?
     
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  3. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
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  4. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
  5. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
    Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying they have mental disabilities, at least those people have a legit disabilities to justify what they do. It's not as noticeable today, but back in the day... oh boy...
     
  6. Dr Fallout

    Dr Fallout Centurion

    Aug 17, 2015
  7. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    Hmm? They are mentally disabled. Maybe you're joking and I don't get it

    I also find it a fun case of archaic naming, like how "mongoloid" has completely fallen out of professional use, because of its recent use as an insult. Like the way Gonzales used the word *special*, the organization sounds like it's mocking the participants :D
    "Special Olympics ;D"
     
  8. R.Graves

    R.Graves Confirmed Retard

    Apr 21, 2016
    I hate euphemisms.
     
  9. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
    Already answered this.

    They are *special*, I'll leave it to your imagination whatever that *special* with asterisks means as opposed to special without them. I bet they themselves would have came up with a thousand more imaginative interpretrations by now.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2016
  10. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    Gonzales, I was replying to Dr Fallout, maybe you mis-quoted

    R. Graves, euphemisms are a natural part of human language, and you and Carlin can dislike it all you want, but it is part of the process of language evolution. For one word to split up into two - or to change meaning, or to change at all, becoming a euphemism is a step it takes
    I really like linguistics, because it is as organic as any other evolution, but it also is political and personal, and therefore people often take offense to languages changing
    It is often youth who bring changes to language, in order to differ themselves from their parents, usually in their teens. By the time of their own adulthood, they will try to revert many of the more drastic changes they did, for then to keep a few. These changes become part of the language, and the next generation then do their own tweaks - and so on

    The most "vital" words stay the same, words like "one, two, three" or "sun" or "you, me"
    This can be observed by comparing language branches that split thousands of years ago, but still retain very similar "vital words"
    Norwegian (germanic): En to tre
    Spanish (latin): Un dos tres
    Norwegian: Sol
    Spanish: Sol
    Norwegian: Du
    Spanish: Tu
     
  11. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
    My fault
     
  12. R.Graves

    R.Graves Confirmed Retard

    Apr 21, 2016
    @zegh8578 I refer to the sun almost exclusively as "That big carcinogenic bastard".
     
  13. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    That reminds me of another linguistic conundrum - the syllables

    Logically, "that big carcinogenic bastard" would be a bad word for something SO common, because we refer to it often, and it therefore needs few syllables.
    Languages tend to gravitate towards shortening, they "cut off", they become "lazier" if you will, but around the world, many languages are very different when it comes to average syllable-count

    Again, Spanish is a good example of a language where a LOT of words have ONE more syllable than they do in Germanic languages
    House / Casa
    Horse / Caballo
    Cat / Gato
    Dog / Perro

    Finnish is on the syllable extreme, having very long words, even for every day concepts
    Chinese is on the opposite extreme, having not only just a syllable for a lot of words, but words that are as good as identical in phonetics - even accent - and only differing in pitch - as in, wether you have a high or dark voice when saying the word.
    Some Scandinavian words are also pitch-based, but they are rather few
     
  14. R.Graves

    R.Graves Confirmed Retard

    Apr 21, 2016
    ...
    I Actually found that interesting.
     
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  15. Dr Fallout

    Dr Fallout Centurion

    Aug 17, 2015
    I was referring to the Orderites.