Zegh's Dinosaur Thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion Forum' started by zegh8578, Jan 23, 2017.

  1. TorontRayne

    TorontRayne Super Eye Patch Man Staff Member Moderator Orderite

    Apr 1, 2005

    Ahh fuck. Twitter. The sum total of our knowledge about the history of life on this planet and I am left with Twitter. Any pdf dumps of the books? I can find terabytes worth of data on damn near everything except archeology and astronomy.
     
  2. Atomkilla

    Atomkilla Hazel Hegemon oTO Orderite

    Dec 26, 2010
  3. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    You don't have a library next to you or something?
     
  4. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    Library, lol, oh crni :D What are you gonna find in the library? The discoveries of Copernicus? :V

    And by that I mean, if the purpose is to stay up to date, then books are counter productive, since they inevitably take a few couple of years to complete, writing, editing, distributing, and by then - there's *a few couple of years* worth of new information available

    Just go to Wikipedia

    TorontRayne, best way to scower PDFs is to again check Wikipedia. In the sources, there are often direct links to papers in PDF format (some are blocked by paywalls, in which case Sci-Hub comes in super-handy). Most of this is pretty damn dry, though - but if you want the easy-on-the-eye summaries OF those papers, then simply stay on that very same Wikipedia page! That's what Wiki does, it summarizes dry and technical information into encyclopedic format

    There are some books you can outright pirate, I've found a couple of good books on piratebay for example, but - see my point above, regarding books. I, for example, got a 1988 book because I really respect the author (I would buy it, but the book has been out of print since the mid 90s). The book itself, and its content, is absolutely outdated, and worth very little nowadays, besides affectional value
     
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  5. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    Thank you. Now I feel old!
     
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  6. TorontRayne

    TorontRayne Super Eye Patch Man Staff Member Moderator Orderite

    Apr 1, 2005
    I'm sure the one or two books in this podunk shithole are from the 70's.
    Thanks Zegh. A little information is better than none.
     
  7. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    It is pretty much what I do, and recently I'm compiling my little dinosaur guide. It's all done via Wikipedia. I'll look up a dino - or a taxonomic group, then scroll straight down to the sources, and by now I have a quick reflex to spot DOI numbers, which means the original paper is available right there (in contrast to older sources which are indeed paper-format issues that you will... indeed... find in libraries. Well, large-scale university libraries, anyway, not public ones)
     
  8. MutantScalper

    MutantScalper Dark side in da houssah

    Nov 22, 2009
    Zegh,

    do you agree with this "T-rex walking speed" -theory? I guess those computer models could be fairly accurate but I'm not sure about it.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...-walker/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.f11019f32fff

     
  9. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    Tyrannosaurus is very hyped as an apex predator - which it was - but it was also *very awkward*
    The tiny-tiny hands is something everybody knows, but it also had a tremendous head compared to other predatory dinosaurs of similar tier, like Allosaurus.
    Compared to Allosaurids, Tyrannosaurids - Tyrannosaurus itself in particular - also had very stubby feet. I'm not at all surprised that Tyrannosaurus could not run with much agility.


    (Top skeleton by style-definer Gregory Paul, author of the 1988 book I mentioned, bottom skeleton of Scott Hartman, one of many more talented "apprentices" of this style of skeletal diagram)

    An analogy I like to imagine is - Allosaurids being tigers and lions, swift, elegant, ferocious - Tyrannosaurids were more like huge, lumbering grizzly-bears - faster than you'd expect, but mostly just burly and strong.
     
  10. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    So a 1988 Book is now OK? But when I talk about libraries I am the idiot!

    *Slams door*
     
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  11. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    Don't get me wrong, I wuv my public library, it's actually pretty up to date, when I was a kid I'd find David Lambert's "Dinosaur Databook" in there, one of the most comprehensive dinosaur databases of its time
    I also discovered Akira, Gen and Frank Miller there, flabbergasting little boy-me. At least on two occasions, the library workers would assume I had erroneously wandered away from the kiddy-section, and would help me back to the little teddy-bear-books and stuff. As soon as they turned their back, I'd scurry right back to the real deal books

    However, it didn't take me long to spend more and more time on their computer, looking for -, lamenting the lack of - and attempting to request books, in particular more updated dinosaur books that I knew existed.

    I ended up moving from the library to the university book-store, where I became a bit of an amusement for the staff, to the point where they'd light up as soon as I entered the store, and show me right to the latest paleontology books :D

    The exponentially growing information concentration of the internet eventually put all that to rest
     
  12. MutantScalper

    MutantScalper Dark side in da houssah

    Nov 22, 2009
    Grizzlies are faaaaaast. When a grizzly 'puts on the jets', it becomes like a missile that goes through branches and knocks over stuff. They are scary. Also, presumably they have the best sense of smell, excluding fish. I don't know anything about dinosauruses. Just wondering if a T-rex might be able to do a kind of lunge attack from the bushes like it did in Jurassic Park when those fast things are running in that field and it lunges from bushes. Maybe not. I have actually read Michael Crichton's book, I remember how he described a T-rex's swimming style.
     
  13. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    Being fairly slow, Tyrannosaurus would be ambush hunter primarily, pursuit second (if at all, most smaller prey would escape easily. The famous Gallimimus scene in Jurassic Park is quite unrealistic in that sense, they would have evaded and escaped a heavy set giant like Tyrannosaurus with ease)

    Speaking of grizzlys, I once saw an interview with this zoologist who studied bears in North America, and he was explaining - while gazing off into the distant horizon, pointing towards the hills, explaining that he spotted a grizzly in such and such direction. As is often with bear-attacks, it was a wandering-through bear, nervous, hungry, aggressive, and not one of his usual bears - who in turn were used to him.
    He said that once the bear charged at him, the distance between them shrank with shocking swiftness, the bear closed in those few hundred metres with such velocity, there was little the zoologist could really do about it.
    Once the bear was on top of him, the guy tried to protect himself by instinctively pushing the bears face away from him. The bear solved this by biting off his fingers and half his hands, snippety snap, and then proceded to bite off a good chunk of his face, bone and all.
    By this point, the guy faces the camera, and continues to explain, and indeed, large parts of his skull seem to be missing o_o, including jaw and cheek-bone portions, obviously covered with skin grafts, but damn...

    The bear apparently lost interest in him, after some scuffling around, and left.

    That's terrifying though, the absolute powerlessness in such a situation. You use your hands, bear bites them off. Then what?

    (actually, there's some video from India of some dude fuckin with a black bear (Baloo!) for then to have his face bitten off chomp by chomp, while villagers try to shout abuse at the bear, and whack it with little sticks. I'm not gonna post it, but you can probably find it with some dedication. The worst is seeing how the bear actually has to pull and yank with some force, each time he pulls a chunk of face off the guy)
     
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  14. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    I guess dinosaurs wouldn't make good pets. People really forget, that their intelligence was also prehistoric. Even those of raptors, which are considered a more intelligent predator.
     
  15. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012

    (by excellent paleo-artist John Conway)
     
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  16. Crni Vuk

    Crni Vuk M4A3 Oldfag oTO Orderite

    Nov 25, 2008
    Probably from a 1988s book of a library.
     
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  17. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    In 1988 only one person drew feathers on dinosaurs - good old Gregory Paul, the most published amateur paleontologist in the world, considered both a pariah and a super-genius of paleontology (pariah because he publishes a lot of litterature, while not having any actual academic credentials. Regardless, he makes shit-tons of sense, and has made remarkable theoretical discoveries that have revolutionized sections of dinosaur paleontology. He's awesome!)


    The 1988 book I cried about as a kid, I was finally in my early 30s when I got my hands on an illegal, digital copy :'(


    He set amazing standards for acuracy and detail


    Here he went berserk and feathered a Coelophysis - even to this day he admits this is highly unlikely and overly flamboyant. Coelophysids are very early, primitive dinosaurs, with zero evidence for feathers, and this was before people accepted even Maniraptorids to be feathered.
    Remarkably, and fitting a GENIUS!!! - there are now indications that proto-dinos might have been fuzzy, meaning a flamboyantly fluffy Coelophysis is no longer an impossibility.

    He also insisted on drawing agile, running dinos, on their toes, with tails lifted in the wind, when others kept insisting on drawing heavy, dragging dinosaurs
    Contemporary John Sibbick:

    John Sibbick's photorealistic paintings were highly impressive to me, untill I came across Gregory Paul, who'd also come up with detailed oils now and then
     
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  18. Atomkilla

    Atomkilla Hazel Hegemon oTO Orderite

    Dec 26, 2010
    Sibbick was my favorite childhood illustrator. I love his works to this day.
     
  19. zegh8578

    zegh8578 Keeper of the trout Orderite

    Mar 11, 2012
    John Sibbick resisted a little bit, but then did come around. In fact, his 90s pieces are still some of my favorite. Once he too begun making dinosaurs swift and dynamic, he REALLY had the hang of that!
    This for example is stunning work:


    My personal favorite though is Doug Henderson,

    I only ever saw his illustrations in one book (which incidentally also featured John Sibbick)
     
  20. Atomkilla

    Atomkilla Hazel Hegemon oTO Orderite

    Dec 26, 2010
    I have a book with that Sibbick's illustrations. Action packed indeed.
     
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