The Guns and Ammo Thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion Forum' started by Kalessin, May 4, 2006.

  1. Mr. Grandma

    Mr. Grandma C3H5N3O9 + NaOH Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    20,000 pages of tax codes and regulations.


    The idea of putting a tube and a chamber with a pellet and black-power in it threatens Democrat sissies and the Bankers on Wall-street.



    No, because then all .223 / 5.56 ammo will be considered armor piercing pistol ammo and everything will be banned.


     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 9, 2016
  2. JohnnyEgo

    JohnnyEgo Mostly Harmless

    400
    Oct 22, 2007
    There are several .223/5.56mm based handguns on the US markets already, but they are all essentially sub-machine gun sized. I frequently assemble AR-15 guns into 'pistol' configurations first, because doing so offers some legal flexibility in my country regarding converting configurations back and forth. Similarly, there are several bolt-action guns like the T&C Encore or the H&R Handi-Shot that can be configured in compact pistol form, but they are not magazine-fed. The length of the cartridge pretty much requires any magazines to be in front of or behind the trigger and grip, which makes for a pretty large and unwieldy handgun in real life.
     
  3. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
    Well, the Fallout .223 pistol/Blade Runner gun has a revolver configuration rather than using a magazine, with a long enough drum I suppose you could fit .223 rounds in it. The original Blade Runner gun is made from .223 rifle parts as well as a pistol, I supose that's why it is a .223 pistol in Fallout.

    EDIT:

    There is a working version of the gun but it's .44 special, so while it could pass for a working Blade Runner gun it would fail to be Fallout's .223 pistol/That Gun :(

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 9, 2016
  4. JohnnyEgo

    JohnnyEgo Mostly Harmless

    400
    Oct 22, 2007
    Clever people can do amazing things, and revolvers resolve the issue with cartridge length, but you are still unlikely to ever see a .223 revolver. Most revolvers use straight wall cartridges which fit tightly in the cylinder, and the actual bullet diameters are very close to the chamber and case diameters. .223 is a necked down cartridge. It would be hard, though not impossible, to support the necked down portion of the cartridge and still have a tight seal at the forcing cone. .223/5.56 also has considerably more pressure than a pistol round, so that would have to be one stout cylinder.

    There are some rifle-cartridge based revolvers, but they are mostly straight-walled cartridges, like the .45-70.
     
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  5. Mr. Grandma

    Mr. Grandma C3H5N3O9 + NaOH Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    Yeah you can make a .223 pistol.

    You can also make a .223 revolver but you need a custom cylinder.

    You need a custom made barrel with an extreme twist-rate to prevent key-holing.

    Thing is, the shorter barrel will decrease velocity to the point where you might just want to shoot a .22 magnum.
     
  6. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
    A realistic version of a rifle cut down into a .223 pistol. Looks different and has only a 1 shot capacity, but makes a big noise just like the Fallout weapon.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 9, 2016
  7. Mr. Grandma

    Mr. Grandma C3H5N3O9 + NaOH Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    .223/5.56 Big Noise.


    Yep. I'm going deaf because of that big noise.
     
  8. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
    For a handgun it does. The same with weapons like the AKS-74U, they use a rifle cartidge in a short barrel, makes a much bigger noise than in a longer barrel and it produces a much larger flash that has probably burned more than one eyebrow. Same with some short barrel handguns, the Bersa .380 actually makes more noise than the 9mm because of the shorter barrel, even if it has a shorter cartidge.
     
  9. Mr. Grandma

    Mr. Grandma C3H5N3O9 + NaOH Orderite

    Nov 3, 2007
    I haven't noticed my .380 being louder than a .38 with a 3 inch barrel, which has cylinder blast.

    Noise is due to how much pressure the round is under, and the sound of the round cutting through the sound barrier more than anything else followed by the shape of the muzzle.

    The 5.56 and the 5.45x39 are high pressure rounds that go above 2900 FPS, that's why they are louder than everything out there besides things like really hot .44 magnums and .50BMGs. If you have a muzzle-break, which most AK-74s have, then you have an extremely loud discharge.

    Like Mike Tyson cumming inside a tiger.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015
  10. WillisPDunlevey

    WillisPDunlevey Mildly Dipped

    534
    Feb 2, 2010
    Some people freak out at the "What you made a firearm" thing. Even the cops were concerned when I was registering them (they have no problem with AR15 pistols made from stripped receivers though.

    In the case of these revolvers, they become "firearms" when you cut the loading trough that allows access to the loading gate (its a permanent modification)
     
  11. WillisPDunlevey

    WillisPDunlevey Mildly Dipped

    534
    Feb 2, 2010
    I have seen one or two working reproductions of Deckards guns. They are 5 shot revolvers with a single shot .222 bolt action on top.
    They are made from a .357 or .44 revolver (Charter arms? :question:) with a bolt action .222 rifle on top of it (single shot with a 1 or 2" barrel). The company that makes the specific .222 rifle is in europe (cant remember the name off the top of my head) and does not sell stripped receivers that have never been made into a rifle or a pistol. This is needed unless you want to register your deckard gun as a Short barreled rifle and pay the feds your $200 tax.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2015
  12. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    Yeah, Deckard's gun is a Charter Arms Bulldog .44 revolver with parts of a Steyr Mannlicher SL rifle put on top of it.
     
  13. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Sonny, I Watched the Vault Bein' Built!

    Aug 21, 2004
    That would explain why it has two triggers, in this version you can see the 223 barrel on top, so maybe it was intended to have a secondary single shot .223 attack universe wise? And this was interpreted in Fallout as it being a .223 pistol. So many obscure things and facts about "that gun".
     
  14. SuAside

    SuAside Testament to the ghoul lifespan
    Admin

    May 27, 2004
    Alright, let's clear some things up:

    1) Forget about a .223 pistol like in Fallout. Even if single shot. Either it keyholes due to the short (nearly unexistent barrel), or your bullet tears itself apart from the insane rifling you added to attempt to stabilize it.

    2) Yes, you can make a Charter Arms .44Special that shoots from a shrouded cylinder with a single working trigger. 2 custom rebuilds are known to exist in working condition, other than the prop hero gun. One should take care to use a reinforced shroud as the escaping gas (from the cylinder gap) could damage the gun (and you) if too thin metal is used. This can be seen as an idiotic proof of concept.

    3) It's assumed by most fans of the movie (and book) that Deckard's pistol has dual fire capability. Hence the two triggers and the two different sound/visual effects used in the movie.
    That said, this is somewhat wishful thinking and retcon by rabid fans like myself, since it's been often said that the pistol came into life simply because Scott saw the rifle receiver lying around at the prop shop and wanted it to be worked into the hero blaster simply because he thought it looked cool.
    Regardless, it seamlessly fits the setting that the gun would shoot both energy based projectiles and conventional kinetic projectiles (or any other combination you might enjoy). One for use on human & one for use on replicants. Or potentially one for use on normal replicants and one for use on combat-rated replicants which would likely be made more resistant to damage.
     
  15. Hassknecht

    Hassknecht For hate's sake. Staff Member Admin Orderite

    Aug 16, 2010
    Yeah, I don't think they really thought about it that much. They wanted a high-powered unique pistol and made it a reference to Blade Runner by its visuals. I think the caliber was .223 because they wanted to have something believably more powerful than any other pistol without having to add a new type of ammunition.
     
  16. JohnnyEgo

    JohnnyEgo Mostly Harmless

    400
    Oct 22, 2007
    Got some new shoes for the 10mm Kimber:

    VZ Carbon Fiber 320s:





    Also found an old Smith & Alexander magwell that I swapped on, too.
     
  17. SuAside

    SuAside Testament to the ghoul lifespan
    Admin

    May 27, 2004
    :obsessed:

    Oh dear lord, that's sexy.
     
  18. JohnnyEgo

    JohnnyEgo Mostly Harmless

    400
    Oct 22, 2007
    I appreciate that. It is a very striking gun in person, but surprisingly hard to take a picture that does the 'Eclipse' finish justice. Had some nice diffuse light from an overcast late afternoon shining at just the right angle to my tail gate, and decided to take advantage of it.
     
  19. AlphaPromethean

    AlphaPromethean Atomic Wrangler

    Mar 16, 2013
    I'm both an American and British Citizen by a technicality (Born and bred British, but have a dual passport)

    I always figured if I ever decided to live in the good ol' U.S of A, I'd probably take up shooting and firearm collecting as a hobby.

    As it stands right now, the SKS is my gun waifu, and due to Britain's shitty gun control laws, my firearm love and I can never be united.
     
  20. Danza

    Danza Salter of Wounds

    19
    Mar 11, 2015
    Everything I currently own:

    From left to right,

    Mauser K98 (The guy who brought it back from Germany in WW2 cut the stock down, making it basically worthless)

    New England 20 gauge

    Ruger 10/22

    Remington 700, .270

    IMG_2119[1].JPG